Government & Military

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How to Include Professional References in a Government & Military Resume

All great workers have a list of colleagues they can turn to for references during a job hunt. These trusted coworkers and advisors have seen you at your best and worst, giving them an unbiased approach when having to discuss your traits with hiring companies. That being said, references are no longer welcome on most resumes.


When Should You Include Professional References in a Government & Military Resume

The practice of cutting off professional references in a government & military resume began when companies started to realize how unnecessary the practice can be. They want more information on the applicants, not space taken up by information they will request further along the interview process.

Even so, there are still some companies that demand this section, and if that’s the case, you need to have it on your resume. However, if they don’t, but you’ve forged a strong relationship with a well-known, highly regarded government or military official whose name would virtually guarantee you an interview, it’s smart to include the person on your resume.


How to Include Professional References in a Government & Military Resume

Should you decide to include references in a government & military resume, there are still a few rules to follow. First, this information is the absolute last section on your resume or should be put on a separate piece of paper. Do not go with a simple “References Available Upon Request.” Secondly, make sure you have the necessary information. This includes name, title, company, address, phone number and email.

Example of Professional References in a Government & Military Resume

Cpl Carter M Brown
IT Specialist
Government Accountability Office
701 5th Ave. #2700
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: (206) 287-4800
Email: brown.carterm@usgao.gov

Tips for Providing Professional References to a Hiring Manager

  • First, decide on the specializations the references should have, then consider their ranks. Just as you want to specialize your resume to fit the needs of the hiring company, you want to specialize your references so that you make as much of an impression on the hiring manager as possible.
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  • Don’t keep your references in the dark about your goals. Share with them your resume and anything else they should know. This ensures that should they be called, they’ll have very specific talking points in regards to the skills and abilities the job you’re applying for requires.
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  • Coach those that need help. Some of your references may be eager to help but clueless in terms of what to do. Be available to talk to them and answer questions. Send them a list of common topics that may come up.
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  • Never assume your colleagues can serve as references. They have lives outside of work and may not have the time necessary to prepare for a reference interview.
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  • Always choose references that will complement the job you’re going for. If you want a position as a Contract Specialist, find references that are fellow contract specialists, senior contractors and acquisition specialists.

Conclusion

References are only as enticing as the resume they are featured on. If you truly want to impress a hiring manager, you need MyPerfectResume’s Resume Builder to help you create a standout resume in only minutes.