5 Soft Skills That Will Score You Brownie Points with an Employer

5 Soft Skills That Will Score You Brownie Points with an Employer
In order to grab employer attention and shine a spotlight on your resume, you’ll need to emphasize your job-specific skills; there’s no doubt about this. Review the job post carefully to identify the clinical, technical, and industry-specific credentials that your target audience will be looking for, and if you can offer these skills, give them top billing in your profile. But beyond the specifics of your industry, there are a few general skills that almost all employers find appealing. And if you can claim these skills, you’ll gain a few extra points if you can find a way to make this clear.

Leadership

This quality took the highest ranking in a study by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), with 80.1 percent of respondents stating that they search for evidence of this trait in candidate resumes. If you can organize a group project, rally a discouraged team, or help your coworkers overcome conflicts that stand in the way of success, find a way to share this information. If you struggle with leadership—or aren’t sure how to claim it on your resume—try taking on more responsibility in your current job or requesting tasks that involve a leadership element.

Teamwork

Great candidates can lead, but they can also fall in line, take direction, and support their teammates when they need too. This can be a tricky quality to prove on a resume, but you’ll stand out if you can use your past accomplishments to highlight this strength.

Communication

According to the UK National Career Service, this quality tops the list of soft skills employers need. Are you able to speak and write in a way that facilitates understanding and helps both parties reach shared goals? Use your words to help others understand your position. Start with the elevated language and precise vocabulary you use in the text of your resume document.

Problem Solving

The career experts at Monster.com give high billing to this valuable trait. The ability to solve problems and think critically and creatively can help you overcome challenges at work. If you’ve used these skills in the past, find a way to share this with potential employers.

Flexibility

Can you accept a last minute change of plan without getting flustered or upset? Can you adapt to new circumstances and unexpected goal changes? Almost all employers value flexibility, and according to the NACE survey, 68.9 percent of employers look for this quality in candidate resumes.—If you feel like you could use more experience in some of these areas, consider signing up for a course or seeking out a personal mentor who can model these qualities and help you gain strength and proficiency. You can also look for volunteering opportunities that can help you test yourself and broaden your abilities. When you’re ready to apply these traits to your job profile, turn to MyPerfectResume for guidance and tools.