Personal Trainer Resume Guide + Tips + Example

You need a great resume if you want a great job as a personal trainer, and we’re here to help you build one. Our guide to crafting a great personal trainer resume will help you make the most of your interpersonal, motivational and creative skills so you stand out from the competition. 

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Personal Trainer Resume Examples

Start by editing this personal trainer resume sample template or explore our library of resume templates to find the best one for you.

Personal trainer resume example (text version)

Jared Kelsey

Miami, FL 33127
555 555 555
(555) 555-5555
example@example.com

Professional Summary

Spirited personal fitness trainer with weight management expertise and the ability to motivate others toward accomplishing weight loss goals. Designs classes to match the skill and learning levels of all participants. Skilled in personal program development and individual life and body assessments.

Skills

  • Fitness instruction
  • Health and wellness
  • Exercise program design
  • Coaching
  • Knowledge of human anatomy
  • Nutrition principles
  • Weight management
  • Healthy living role model

Work History

May 2018 – Current
Crunch Fitness – Miami, FL
Personal Trainer

  • Design specific workout systems for 30 individual clients based on performance ability.
  • Provide clients with safe reasonable exercise to perform at home or at the gym.
  • Train clients on a variety of strength training, cardiovascular exercises and stretching techniques.

September 2016 – March 2018
Planet Fitness – Miami, FL
Front Desk Associate

  • Greeted 70+daily visitors upon arrival, offered assistance and answered questions to build rapport and retention.
  • Increased membership enrollment by 20% using innovative sales and promotional techniques.
  • Leveraged POS system to sell water, energy drinks, snacks and other gym items.

June 2015 – August 2016
Win-Dixie – Miami, FL
Cashier

  • Replenished sales floor merchandise and organized shelves, racks and bins for optimal appearance.
  • Completed sales in excess of $2,500 with a near-zero error rate using POS system.
  • Checked prices for customers and processed items sold by scanning barcodes.

Education

May 2018
University of Miami Miami, FL
Bachelor of Arts Kinesiology

5 essentials of a top personal trainer resume

  1. Contact details

    Add your contact information to the top of your resume; otherwise, hiring managers won’t know how to contact you for an interview. You must display your contact information like so: Your full name, then your city, state and ZIP code, followed by your phone number and professional email address. Add your LinkedIn profile and professional website (if you have them) last.

  2. Personal statement

    A personal statement is also known as a professional summary. This is where you introduce yourself and highlight your top qualifications for the job in three to five sentences. A resume for a personal trainer must include a professional summary with  appropriate skills and one or two notable accomplishments, and it should touch on how long you’ve been in the industry.

  3. Skills

    You’ve got to let potential employers know what skills you bring to the table. Create a separate section for your job-relevant skills and display them with bullet points to make them easy to read. As our sample personal trainer resume shows, include hard and soft skills, from human anatomy to your innate leadership ability.

  4. Work history

    Your resume must include an employment history section, whether or not you have professional experience as a personal trainer. In reverse-chronological order, list current and previous employers and provide business names, locations and the dates you worked for each. Include three bullet points of measurable achievements for every job you list. If you’re applying for your first job as a personal trainer, it’s acceptable to highlight any extracurricular activities, coursework, presentations, volunteer experience and community service.

  5. Education

    Hiring managers want to see your education credentials, so a resume for a personal trainer job must include an education section. Add all the educational institutions you’ve attended after high school and display the name of the schools and the years that you graduated in reverse-chronological order using bullet points. If you did not attend college, then list your high school information and the classes you’ve taken since graduating.

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Do’s and don’ts for building a personal trainer resume

  • Use measurable achievements to describe your personal trainer abilities and experience.
  • Use action words to make an impact on your personal trainer resume.
  • Tailor your resume to your target personal trainer job.
  • Use keywords from the job description throughout your personal trainer resume.
  • Format your personal trainer resume so that it is easy to read by ATS software and human eyes.
  • Lie about your personal trainer experience and skills.
  • Boast that you’re the “best personal trainer ever.”
  • Include irrelevant personal information such as your ethnicity and age.
  • Add skills and experience that do not pertain to personal trainer.
  • Forget to proofread. A personal trainer resume with errors is unprofessional.

Top 4 tips for acing a personal trainer interview

  1. Learn about the institution.

    It’s vital to take the time to learn about the institution or company’s history, goals, values and people before the interview. Doing so conveys interest, passion and commitment — traits that can set you above the competition. Plus, having a glimpse of the company culture early on will help you know what to expect and can give you a confidence boost.

  2. Practice at home.

    Practice really does make perfect. To practice for your interview, start by reviewing the most common interview questions, such as: 

    And some possible behavioral questions include:

    Write down two or three possible answers as you review potential questions, then review them with a friend or a family member in a mock interview so you can get comfortable with the questions and memorize your answers.

  3. Ask questions.

    You should always have at least three questions ready to ask every job interview you encounter; those who do tend to get hired more often than those who don’t because they show motivation, keen interest and thoughtfulness. 

    Some questions you might ask for a personal trainer job are: 

    • What are the clients like?
    • What are your expectations for the first 90 days?
    • What does a successful personal trainer look like to you?
  4. Gather references.

    You’ll need professional references quickly if the hiring manager offers you the job after the interview. Having them ready will save you stress and time, so prepare a list of two former colleagues and a former manager who are willing to speak to your abilities to perform the job of a personal trainer and who you know will give you a stellar review.