English Teacher CV Guide + Tips + Example

Find the right job for you with a well-written English teacher CV. With our guide, you can craft an effective English teacher CV that will showcase your skills and present you as a desirable candidate.

AVERAGE RATING
4.4/5 stars with 108 reviews

English Teacher CV Example

Start by editing this English teacher CV sample template or explore our 40+ CV templates to find the best one for you.

English teacher CV example (text version)

Jeanne Rogers

Miami, FL 33127
555 555 555
(555) 555-5555
example@example.com

Summary Statement

Highly capable professional English teacher and professor with a focus on student learning and engagement. Experienced teacher and facilitator with 16 years of service in the postsecondary academic setting. Dedicated to teaching students the principles of college-level writing, literature analysis and close reading. Exceptional knowledge of delivering instruction with technology and empowering students to use valuable resources. Excellent understanding of curriculum development and assessment methods based on research and practice.

Core Qualifications

  • Learning modalities
  • Grammar instruction
  • AP and college prep
  • Group and individual instruction
  • Online or virtual education
  • MS Office and Google Classroom
  • Time management
  • Communication

Education

Florida International University Miami, FL
Ph.D. English Literature

Florida International University Miami, FL
Master of Science Curriculum & Instruction

Florida International University Miami, FL
Bachelor of Arts English Literature

Work Experience

August 2011 – Current
University Of Miami – Miami, FL
Lead English Professor

  • Develop a scope and sequence of learning activities using university course objectives, curriculum standards and student learning goals.
  • Evaluate student work, such as literary writing, research papers and analysis tasks, by using teacher-developed rubrics and holistic practices.
  • Lead semester-long research projects with a team of 20 students and assist with topic selection, idea development and sourcing to support a university-wide focus on comprehensive research.

January 2007 – August 2011
Keiser University – Miami, FL
Academic English Professor

  • Conducted five lectures each day for undergraduate and graduate-level courses on a variety of topics related to English literature or language.
  • Coached 40 students in developing solid prose when writing literary analysis papers by going over drafts and suggesting revisions and edits.
  • Led a committee to create a student writing center to assist students struggling with the basics of academic writing.

December 2001 – January 2007
Allison Academy – Miami, FL
Secondary English Teacher

  • Advised the university curriculum development team on new recommendations for college-level literature studies for 80 students.
  • Created course materials, assessments, projects and a syllabus for each course in English literature studies during a semester.
  • Published several papers and book-length research studies in professional journals related to the English language and literature analysis.

Research Experience

  • Explored and analyzed ethics in the publishing system in “The Author’s
  • Property” (2018) Advanced Studies Laboratory, Florida International University
  • Worked and participated in thesis assessment as research lead in “The Impact of English Literature in Contemporary Culture” (2017) English Department, Florida International University

Publications

  • Rogers, Jeanne. “Social Media and the New English Language.” The Mercury: The Student Art & Literary Magazine of Gettysburg College 1,020, April 2, 2020.
  • Rogers, Jeanne. “Contemporary Poems: Long Word.” The Mercury: The Student Art & Literary Magazine of Gettysburg College 1,019, April 2, 2019.
  • Rogers, Jeanne. “The Literature on Memes and the New Way to Write.” Florida’s Classical Studies Publication 2,000, October 1, 2018.

Relevant Skills

  • Excellent ability to facilitate and teach difficult concepts to students, including breaking down topics, scaffolding, re-teaching and checking for understanding.
  • Exemplary oral and written communication skills when delivering lectures to students and communicating with staff or other members of the university.
  • Ability to foster beneficial and supportive relationships with students and other faculty members.
  • Motivated to work independently, achieve my personal best, publish valuable research and be a contributing member of the university community.
  • Strength to persist despite obstacles, such as lack of resources, a limited amount of class time and other challenges in the classroom.

Certifications and Licenses

  • Teacher certification, English Licensure, Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) – (Updated 2021)
  • TESOL certification – (2019)

Languages

  • English
    Native or Bilingual
  • Spanish
    Limited Working

Hobbies and Interests

After my teaching day has ended, I spend much of my free time working on writing and publishing my original poetry. When each poem has been completed, I share it with the community. At the university, I sponsor several poetry activities as a volunteer. I have organized a poetry night event that is held once a month in one of the dining halls for poetry reading and discussion.

5 essentials of a top English teacher’s CV

  1. Contact details

    The contact details are crucial to an English teacher CV. This section will have all the information needed to contact you for an interview. The standard goes: full name, city, state and zip code, followed by phone number and email address. Finally, add a professional website, LinkedIn profile or any other professional networking profile.

  2. Personal statement

    This section is your introduction to the hiring manager. Also called a professional summary, this is where you present your best skills and your related work experience. 

    In no more than five sentences, you will let the recruiter know: how long you have been in the industry, one or two professional accomplishments and your job-relevant skills. Pick your best to grab the hiring manager’s attention.

  3. Skills

    Skills are key for any hiring manager. It shows what you bring to the table and how you work with others. To create a skills section that catches the recruiter’s attention, be sure to include keywords from the job description. Then, create a bulleted list of hard skills, like your tech knowledge or pedagogical approach, and soft skills, such as empathy and diversity. If this is your first job in education, you can include transferable skills from other employment.

  4. Work history

    Your work history tells the recruiters how much experience you have in the field. List it in reverse-chronological order and add the company names, locations and dates of employment. For every job, include a bulleted list of three measurable accomplishments, like an improvement in assessment scores, growth in enrollment or any other quantifiable achievement. 

    If this is your first job, you can include other relevant work experience, like volunteer experiences, community services, professional projects and more.

  5. Education

    Education will be critical in a CV for an English teacher, so pay special attention to this section. Using bullet points, include the educational institution’s name, the degree conferred and graduation year. You can omit the graduation date if it has been over 10 years. If you did not attend college, list your high school and any other post-high school course you’ve completed.

See why My Perfect Resume is a 5-star resume builder

Pair your CV with a matching cover letter

Do’s and don’ts for building an English teacher CV

  • Use measurable achievements to describe your english teacher skills and experience.
  • Use action words to make an impact on your english teacher CV.
  • Tailor your CV to your target english teacher job.
  • Use keywords from the job description throughout your english teacher CV.
  • Format your english teacher CV so that it is easy to read by ATS software and human eyes.
  • Lie about your english teacher experience and skills.
  • Boast about your “incomparable” english teaching abilities.
  • Include irrelevant personal information such as your ethnicity and age.
  • Add skills and experience that do not pertain to english teaching. 
  • Forget to proofread. A english teacher CV with errors is unprofessional.

Top 4 tips for acing an English teacher interview

  1. Research the company or institution before your interview.

    Learn from the website and social media profile. 

    It’s vital to take the time to learn about the company’s history, goals, values and people before the interview. Being able to show that you have in-depth knowledge about your potential employer shows real interest, dedication and commitment — traits that hiring managers look for in every job candidate they talk to. Plus, having a glimpse of the company culture before you arrive will give you an idea of what to expect on arrival so that you can feel confident.

  2. Practice at home.

    Prepare for any scenario by practicing an interview at home. Start by reviewing the most common interview questions, such as: 

    Ask a friend or relative to perform a mock interview. Look online for possible interview questions, write down the answers and then practice with your interview partner. Once you’re done, ask them for feedback and work with them to improve. Being prepared will boost your confidence and chances of getting a callback. 

    Pro tip: if possible, practice in front of a mirror. Look at your facial expressions and body language, which hiring managers will notice.

  3. Be proactive and ask questions.

    At the end of your interview, you will be asked if you have any questions. As a rule of thumb, have three questions prepared. Hiring managers expect questions during or at the end of the interview. This shows your enthusiasm and interest in the role. 

    Here are a few examples of questions to get you started:

    • What goals have you set for this position?
    • What language initiatives are in your future?
    • What challenges are you expecting this school year? 
    • How is the teacher-administration relationship?
    • What tools do you provide the teachers to excel in the classroom?
  4. Round up your references.

    Once you are ready to start sending in applications, contact former managers and colleagues to be potential references. They should be able to vouch for you, your work ethic and your skills. Explain to them where you are in the process and let them know they could receive a phone call or email. Ask if they could prepare a letter of recommendation for you. This will depend on what the hiring manager requests. 

    If this is your first full-time job, you can request a reference from a former professor, community leader, volunteer coordinator or classmate that can vouch for your skills.