5 Common Manager Interview Questions & Answers

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Even after you have written a stellar resume and cover letter, you need to be thoroughly prepared for what comes next: the face-to-face interview. You have already impressed the interviewer with the information on your resume. The interview is your chance to solidify that impression by going into greater detail about the qualities that make you the best candidate for the open manager position.

It would be foolish to go into the interview without preparing first. In addition to being ready to tackle questions about why you want to be a manager and what your greatest strengths are, you need to be ready to discuss aspects of your personality that would be beneficial to leading a team. To help get you started, here are some typical manager interview questions and answers. Your answers should be relevant to your own unique experiences, but these should give you an idea of how to phrase your responses.

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5 Manager Interview Questions & Answers

1. What is your overall attitude toward management?

In my experience, the most effective managers are those who lead. Instead of micromanaging everything, I make sure to give employees enough leeway so that they feel free to accomplish a task however they see fit. I also make sure to explain why a task needs to be performed so that an employee is not doing something without understanding why it is important. I also believe in creating a caring atmosphere where workers feel completely comfortable approaching me if they have a question about a responsibility. Ensuring everyone has the resources needed to thrive is crucial to the overall success of the company.

2. Describe a time when you failed or made a mistake.

When I was managing a store, I made an error when calculating revenue. I thought we had made more in a given month than we actually had, so I thought we were all good with rent and paying utilities. When those bills actually came in, I found the error and realized revenue was drastically down that month. We managed to get by, albeit barely. From that point on, I made sure to have someone double-check my math so that a mistake like that never got past me again.

3. How do you keep your staff motivated?

When it comes to motivation and retaining excellent employees, I truly believe it is the little things that count. Whenever someone accomplishes a task, I make sure to thank them for a job well done. I also believe it is crucial to recognize when someone goes above and beyond the call of duty. Whether it is a simple shout out in a company email or a little bonus in their next paycheck, showing that an employee’s hard work is noticed is crucial.

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4. How would you handle employees who are failing at their jobs?

In the past I have utilized the three strikes rule. For example, once I had an employee who regularly could not be found, and I discovered that he was routinely going to a different room to goof off and play on his phone. First, I spoke with him about this and told him that this behavior cannot be tolerated. After I found him playing on his phone during a shift again, I gave him a three-day suspension. Once he returned, everything seemed to be going fine. However, he fell back on old habits and started shirking his duties once again. At that point, I realized this was a lost cause and had to terminate his employment.

5. How efficient are you with time management?

I realize that there are only so many hours in a day. Therefore, when I need to figure out what needs to happen, I divide tasks into what can be accomplished in a day, what needs a week and what requires a month. I delegate tasks to the staff members who I believe are best equipped to accomplish the goal within the parameters set. I keep a spreadsheet of everything and mark an item as finished once that time comes. This allows me to know what has already been done and what still needs to be accomplished going forward.

These manager interview questions and answers should give you a decent idea of what you are going to encounter in an interview for a managerial job.

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