5 Common Restorative Nurse Interview Questions & Answers

BUILD MY RESUME

After spending years preparing, you are now ready to step into your new career in restorative nursing. Perfecting your resume is only the first step of the job hunt process. A single position likely has dozens of applicants, of whom only the most highly qualified have been invited back for a face-to-face interview. Your on-paper persona has caught the eye of your potential employer; now it’s time to seal the deal by acing the interview.

This part of the process is particularly important for positions requiring high-level interpersonal skills, such as that of restorative nurse. While you will likely be asked many general interview questions, there are also many industry-specific questions which your employer will use to determine if you have the right personality to excel. Review the following common restorative nurse interview questions and use the example answers as a template for your own.

5 Restorative Nurse Interview Questions & Answers

1. Can you describe a situation in which you worked with someone you didn’t like and how you handled it?

In nursing school I was partnered with student who was struggling with coursework. While I know my professor aimed to give her a chance to catch up with my help, the experience frustrated both of us. She resented my confidence, and I felt my own learning was being impeded. At first I let this frustration show, which only made matters worse. She was embarrassed and lashed out. I finally stepped back and looked at the situation from her viewpoint and thought about how infuriating it is to struggle with a topic others seem to understand effortlessly. I modified my approach and opened our next conversation with a summary of her viewpoint without assigning blame or judgement. She seemed honestly relieved. She agreed to let me tutor her in the areas she was weak and quickly caught up with the class. Because I learned to step back and honestly understand her perspective, we were able to come together and complete our goals for the rest of the term.

2. Would you describe yourself as organized?

Yes, absolutely. My older sisters used to tease me as a kid because I always kept my dolls and my rock collection organized in a very specific order. It just made sense to me. Nothing was ever lost; whenever I needed something I knew right where I left it. I have known many people who have struggled with trying to consistently recreate my process, but I have always thrived on the ability to structure my world with order and uniformity.

3. Describe a time your work was criticized and how you handled it.

I grew up as a high achiever in a small town, which meant that I was used to being the best without trying. After my first paper was returned with a low B, I was in shock. During my professor’s office hours, I was told I was no longer able to skate by on my abilities. If I wanted to succeed I had to find a way to challenge myself and grow. At first I was insulted, but the truth of what he told me sank in and changed the way I approached my schooling. I probably could have gotten by on some level with my innate abilities, but I wouldn’t be where I am now if I hadn’t been open to his honest criticism.

4. Why are you interested in this particular nursing job?

I have been involved with a few of your public outreach programs and was impressed with the level of community engagement and positive company culture. Your facility has an established reputation in providing well-rounded, compassionate care. I was also drawn to your focus on senior health care, a group I find particularly fulfilling to work with. I began pulling my resume together as soon as I saw you had an opening.

5. Why did you choose restorative nursing?

Although I have some volunteer experience in emergency care, I have found that my presence is most valuable in situations in which I am able to develop a relationship with patients. I am often able to build a relationship even with difficult patients who resist other staff members. While I love watching the hard work of patients pay off as they recover, I am honored to be a part of a longer-term care plan regardless of outcome. I chose a career as a restorative nurse because I believe this is where I can best apply my strengths.

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