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Disc Jockey Resume: Examples and Tips

A disc jockey (or DJ) manages music for a wide variety of audiences and events, working at radio stations, nightclubs or independent music events. Job requirements include a fundamental understanding of music of various genres, and interacting with people at events, concerts and parties, or over broadcasts. To land this job, you need a charismatic personality, with strong communication and creative skills.

To construct a resume that gets you a DJ job, use these professional tips and resume examples:

Top 4 Characteristics of a Best-in-class Disc Jockey Resume

  1. Summary Provide a quick overview of your top skills, experience and accomplishments in a few concise sentences. Scan the job listing and find common threads in your work history and skills which best apply to the given job. For example, phrases like “excellent interpersonal skills with a charismatic and energetic personality” intersect well with a club DJ position.
  2. Skills Carefully go through the job description and find the phrases that best describe the job (e.g., “problem-solving mentality” or “ability to lift equipment up to 30 lbs”). Identify skills you have that best match these requirements, and add them to this section. Be sure to have a mix of technical abilities (e.g., knowledge of soundboards and mixing equipment) and intangible, or “soft” abilities (e.g., an outgoing, friendly personality, or the ability to multitask).
  3. Work history Instead of simply listing previous job tasks, emphasize specific responsibilities that brought value to the company or venue. For example, it is more impactful to write “Curated playlists to consistently satisfy audiences in a 200+ person venue”) rather than just plainly stating you worked as an in-house DJ.
  4. Education In this section, mention any qualifications you have in the field of multimedia entertainment. For instance, a degree in radio broadcasting indicates you’re familiar with audio equipment and software used during performances. A degree in media business also shows you’re knowledgeable about the types of music listeners of specific demographics prefer. Also mention any workshops attended, or training and certifications received, in related fields such as public speaking or audio production.

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Find the Right Template for Your Resume

Don’t worry about finding the right style for your resume — our employer-ready templates can be used to create your own customized DJ resume:

Original

This template goes beyond the standard black-and-white look, with the major sections of your document distinguished by different color tones.

Impactful

This design provides both a strong header for the job applicant’s name, plus a dual-column approach that gives your information a fresh, modern look.

Cool

This contemporary layout draws attention to your top skills in the left column, while leaving plenty of room to customize your summary and work history sections.

For more free layouts, visit our resume templates page.

Do’s and Don’ts for Creating Your Resume

  • DO include relevant soft skills While skills like proficiency in music mixing software and an encyclopedic knowledge of music are fundamental to this job, employers are also looking for intangible abilities such as spontaneity, excellent communication and an outgoing, crowd-pleasing personality. Include these attributes in your summary and skills section and show how you’ve used them in your work history section (e.g., “Utilized superior communication and interactive skills to stage successful music sets at wedding parties of 200+ participants”).
  • DO use action verbs Instead of using passive phrases such as “was tasked with” or “was responsible for,” use strong, active verbs to describe your accomplishments, and present yourself as a proactive, take-charge employee. For example, statements like “I am a talented music curator possessing exceptional relationship-building skills and technical training in electronic music production” should be replaced by phrases like “a creative, detail-oriented music curator with training in electronic music production.”
  • DO prepare different resumes for different jobs Even if you’re applying for the same job with different employers, don’t use one version of your resume for all your applications — after all, a disc jockey on board a cruise liner has a different set of requirements than a disc jockey at an event company. Always look at the job listing to pinpoint what’s required, and then address those requirements by featuring the appropriate skills and work accomplishments in your own resume, building customized versions of your resume for each job.
  • DON’T write long objective statements For resume writing, an objective statement in which you state your career goals is a thing of the past. Instead of telling hiring managers what you want, tell them what you can bring to the table with a short, concise summary statement. For example, writing “Enthusiastic Disc Jockey with 5 years’ experience creating custom playlists for a wide range of clients and venues” is much more informative for an employer than describing the kind of job you hope to have.
  • DON’T forget to proofread Always read through your resume before submitting it — grammar mistakes or typos are among hiring managers’ top resume pet peeves. Use a spell-checker and also read through the resume to make sure all your information is accurate and relevant. Also look to have a trusted friend vet your document. Sometimes a second pair of eyes can help catch errors.
  • DON’T leave out relevant certifications or activities Include all activities you have taken part in that show off abilities that are needed for DJ work, such as volunteering as a volunteer MC at a nonprofit event, or having experience performing checks on venues and equipment for special events. Any extracurricular experience gained by doing independent gigs should also be incorporated in your resume, as well as any training in equipment handling, music production and crowd engagement.

Disc Jockey Resume FAQs

1. What skills can be included in the resume for a disc jockey position?

Hard skills:Soft Skills:
Creating sets and playlistsInterpersonal skills
Equipment setup and teardownCommunication abilities
Operating soundboards and turntablesCreative thinking
Making mashups and remixesDetail-oriented
BeatmatchingPhysical stamina
Live performances and crowd engagementCrowd-pleaser
Knowledge of modern music trendsPresentation skills
Technology-proficientTime management
Computer skillsCustomer service
Electronic music production
Hard skills:
Creating sets and playlists
Equipment setup and teardown
Operating soundboards and turntables
Making mashups and remixes
Beatmatching
Live performances and crowd engagement
Knowledge of modern music trends
Technology-proficient
Computer skills
Electronic music production
Soft Skills:
Interpersonal skills
Communication abilities
Creative thinking
Detail-oriented
Physical stamina
Crowd-pleaser
Presentation skills
Time management
Customer service

2. What is the best way to incorporate keywords in the resume?

More and more, companies are using applicant tracking systems (ATS) to filter out unqualified applicants, based on keywords from the job posting. To create a resume that passes ATS, scan the job description to identify specific words and phrases that define what the job entails (e.g., “motivated to learn” or “strong communication skills”). When writing your resume, include skills and work experiences that apply to these keywords, such as listing “strong verbal communication” under your skills, or “Learned and mastered CrossDJ mixing software to create popular playlists at nightclub parties.”

3. How should a disc Jockey resume be formatted?

While a certain amount of technical proficiency is required for a DJ position, your interpersonal and intangible skills should also be emphasized. To create a resume that shows off this full range of skills while also providing room to detail your work accomplishments, use a combination format. If you’re just starting out in the business but can present skills and training that fit the job, go for a functional format, which puts the focus on your professional skills and educational background.

4. What are some examples of training and certifications that fit a disc jockey resume?

Some institutes offer courses in audio engineering training, electronic music production and audio and video system repair — all of this training should be included in your education section. If you lack professional experience, you can also add internships and independent projects in your work experience section to prove you have some familiarity with DJ work.

5. How should you craft your resume if you are looking to take the next step forward in your career?

Consider gaining more experience in the following activities, and adding them to your skills, education and work history sections:

  • Networking is crucial for growing as a DJ. Expand your reach and contacts by reaching out to nightclub managers and event organizers and getting small independent gigs.
  • Take on tasks that show you are going above and beyond your standard duties, such as being a venue or event MC.
  • Work your way up from doing independent gigs to setting up your brand. Create a distinguished brand identity with your name and logo. Marketing yourself and your music under your brand name can help create a niche audience and increase your fan base.
  • Work on remixes, mashups and soundtracks to be released as independent songs or as part of albums. Work with music production houses to release music in the public domain.
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