Give Me a Specific Example of a Time When You Solved a Problem Using Good Judgment

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When you go to your first face-to-face meeting with an employer- you may get asked different kinds of questions. Interviewers often use traditional inquiries to learn about the concrete facts of your past- such as education- experience and career-building. When a hiring manager wants to gain insight into how you might use your skills during specific situations in the future- he or she will likely ask you behavioral interview questions about your past. The ‘give me a specific example of a time when you solved a problem using good judgment’ query is behavioral.

This specific inquiry is often asked because the hiring manager wants to understand your ability to judge a situation. You should try to highlight your problem-solving- communication and analysis skills to set yourself apart from the competition while showing the interviewer what makes you right for the position. Some employers may use slightly different wording to ask the same question. You might hear ‘give me a specific example of a time when you used good judgment and logic to solve a problem’ or ‘can you tell me about a time you had to use good judgment to resolve an issue.’ This type of interview inquiry can be hard to answer if you do not take the time to prepare your response and use the right answering method.

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How to Answer the ‘Give Me a Specific Example of a Time When You Solved a Problem Using Good Judgment’ Behavioral Interview Question

Emphasize How You Solve Problems. There are a few different inquiries the hiring manager could make regarding your ability to solve problems. If this question is asked- this is likely an important skill for the job at hand. This means you want to emphasize your problem-solving method throughout the answer to make it clear you will be able to do what it takes for the position. A major part of problem solving includes how you gather and organize information about the problem so you can identify the cause-effect relationship. All of this typically leads to you coming up with solutions- but for this reply you need to make sure your good judgement was involved as well.

Practice Organizing Your Answer. If you want to give the best reply possible- you need to think of an appropriate story before you go into the interview. Has there been a situation where your good judgement was crucial to your problem-solving abilities? Answering behavioral interview questions is challenging because of all of the details needed to give a coherent reply. You can make the process easier by practicing an organizational method for your responses to this type of query. Many experts suggest using the STAR method. This method consists of a few basic components:

  • • Situation or Task: Take the time to lay out the situation you were in to ensure you give the context needed for your reply to make sense.
  • • Actions: What steps did you have to take to get from the start of your problem to the end? Highlight the important skills you used to take action and solve the problem.
  • • Result: Be specific about the results you were able to achieve thanks to your problem-solving skills and good judgment.

Try to Be Detailed About Your Judgment. No matter what kind of question you are replying to, you want to be detailed where it matters. Giving glib answers might make it seem like you are trying to hide something from the hiring manager. At the same time, you do not want to go into too much detail to the point where you take up all of the allotted time answering one simple question. You need to find a balance. When it comes to your judgment, you need to be clear about your thought process and how you generated a solution. Otherwise it may seem like you made an unfounded and uneducated decision about something that could have had a strong impact on your past company.

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Sample ‘Give Me a Specific Example of a Time When You Solved a Problem Using Good Judgment’ STAR Interview Answer

At the last bank I worked at, part of my job was to help clients get personal loans. One such client came to me looking for a $7,000 personal loan to help make ends meet. I started the pre-loan process of reviewing the client’s financial history. That was when I discovered the loan he was asking for would likely make his situation worse and it might never be paid back to the bank. I had to decide what to do for this client. I couldn’t give him the loan because he was too much of a risk, but he had come to the bank for help. I took the time to analyze his situation, and I realized that by consolidating the debt he had currently, he would be able to save a few hundred dollars every month. I talked over his options with him. While it wasn’t what he had wanted, he was happy we were able to help. In the end, his consolidation was good for him and the bank.

You need to practice answering this and other behavioral interview questions if you really want to do well during the face-to-face meeting.

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